Introduction

Hailing from the same recording label as Beautiful Eulogy, Propaganda brings a frank conversational style to his discussion of a variety of issues. While analysis of our current social crises is driving many to socialism, nationalism, hateful sectionalism, and any number of other responses, Propaganda presents the issues in their true light–analyzing them not from the purely human-centric perspective, but under a perspective shaped by the Bible.

Content

Propaganda has released a number of albums over the past several years, many of which deal heavily with various issues in society. His latest album, Crooked, is much the same, but after watching events unfold over the past few years with more careful attention than before–riots, shootings, elections, transgender controversies, injustices–his latest songs have carried a weighty relevance for me that few musical albums have before. His song “It’s Complicated” addresses how multi-faceted and complicated people are, and how much greater the image we are made in is than the ones we try to create for ourselves:

We may scratch ourselves raw to erase the image we were made in
Smoke, snort, sex or drown out the silence
We may waste our life savings on makeovers
To try to rhinoplast our daddy’s nose away
But no nip, no tuck could cut away the sense of obligation
We are becoming what we are not
But what we are is inescapable
You are a masterpiece fighting to be a silly selfie with a hideous filter
You are heavens handmade calligraphy
Slumming it among papyrus fonts

The song “Crooked” addresses the injustices and the lack of compassion that has been shown to many in the African American community. However, while anyone can sing about the problems in the world, the Gospel never lets us despair. Similarly, Propaganda’s songs, while painfully honest at times, are incessantly upward-focused toward Christ–we are all sinners in need of the same Savior. Whenever an artist goes to the source–to Christ’s goodness and man’s sinfulness–only then can a real, constructive, healing dialogue begin. This is something that Propaganda does well–seeing beyond the surface level differences to the underlying issue that plagues us all.

Style

Having listened to a decent amount of rap over the years, Propaganda’s style has always struck me as being more on the, excuse the vulgarity, “wordy” end of the spectrum. While with some rap you can get lost in the rhythm and easily follow the lyrics, with Propaganda the words are much more forward and require constant attention. This is by no means detrimental, but does mean he should not be played as “background” music.

Conclusion

Whenever discussing social issues, the Gospel must be the linchpin of any discussion. Without it we simply become driven by anger and pain. Without Jesus we all become content with playing in the mud, not imagining the amazing vistas of possibility. Propaganda brings the Gospel with his music, and this makes every issue he tackles, no matter how difficult, horrendous, and muddy it may seem, one that points us back to the Great Physician. He is a much needed voice in modern times.

Why couldn’t you just hug me?
Look me in the eyes and tell me love is lovely
Ribbons in the sky that Stevie Wondie flung me
Sing lullabies to the son you brung me
But your eyes just won’t keep they mouth shut

[…]

I could tell the future, we’re a broken record
I’ma say something then I’m gon’ regret it
And you’ll put up a wall and I’ma try to wreck it
Love is not love if it’s never been tested

-Bear With Me

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